Arthur Saxon: The Iron Master

saxon1Arthur ‘The Iron Master’ Saxon was born Arthur Hennig in 1878 in the German town of Leipzig.

Born eleven years later, Arthur “The Iron Master” Saxon was in many ways the antithesis of Eugen Sandow.

Despite taking a very similar route in the iron game, both were German strongmen in European circuses, Saxon’s motivations were purely based in strength whereas Sandow concentrated on the aesthetic body.

Learning the Craft

Not the consummate academic, Saxon at the age of 14, dropped out of school. He promptly took up strength training with weights made by himself out of stone.

 

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Onnit Alpha Brain Review

alpha brain reviewYou might wonder why I am reviewing Alpha Brain from Onnit Labs. To the average trainee, supplements for brain function seems to have little to do with muscular development training

What has a nootropic supplement have to do with strength and conditioning?

Well, as more advanced trainees inherently know there is an important connection between the muscle and the mind when seriously developing our bodies.

From Sandow to Schwarzenegger, Hepburn to Karwoski, and Kazmaier to Pudzianowski, all bodybuilding, powerlifting and strongman champions have spoken to some degree on the importance of the muscle/mind connection when engaging in training and competition.

 

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Alexander Zass: The Amazing Samson

zass2Alfonso Alexander Zass is a legendary strong man, and one of most prominent during his era.

He was born in 1888, a native to Lithuania. Although he was only 5'4 feet tall and weighed 165 pounds and not very muscular, he made up for his physique with his awesome strength and endurance. 

He was known for his strength, surprisingly enough, he didn't engage in any weightlifting, which lead some to wonder how he had grown so strong. He earned his name "The Amazing Samson" because of the many different feats of strength he would perform. He is well know also for being a significant proponent of isometric exercise which was his primary training method. He is a man of many other talents aside from those of a strong man.

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Strength and Health: Setting and Achieving Goals in an Old School Way

BillPearlWell, another year is in the books. And I am sure you have a set of strength and health goals for the coming New Year.

But do you really?

The reason I ask is while most of you most likely have strength or muscular development targets, I don’t know if all of you have made these goals with improved health in mind.

Over Christmas I read a series of articles written by John McCallum in the Sixties with just this topic in mind and it got me thinking about my health in relation to my strength

 

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Mike Mentzer: Genius or Lunatic

This is a guest post by Jason Ferruggia

http://www.musclegainingsecrets.com 

mentzer1‚ÄčIf you don’t know who Mike Mentzer was I will give you some quick background. He was a famous bodybuilder who competed back in the seventies and eighties against none other than Arnold, himself.

He was known for being a huge proponent of extremely low volume training. Mike was either loved or hated; there was no in between.

He had some radical view points and an in-your-face way of expressing them. He even had the balls to call Arnold out about his high volume training protocols and say what a complete waste of time it all was. 

 

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Doug Hepburn: Canadian Strongman

hepDoug Hepburn is undoubtedly one of the great Canadian athletic legends.

At the peak of his career he was considered the strongest man alive.

Doug is now acknowledged by many – along with Paul Anderson – as the grandfather of modern powerlifting.  

Like Louis Cyr, nearly a century before, Hepburn put Canada firmly on the map in the strength world.

Doug was a truly multi-talented individual, whose skills and interests took him beyond the realms of sport to make him an inventor, storyteller, philosopher, and singer. 

Most importantly Doug Hepburn should be seen as a true strength innovator.

 

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Milo of Croton: Father Of Progressive Resistance

milo3Milo of Croton, an ancient world legendary athlete, is best remembered for his might and great strength.

He was born in Croton, a Greek colony in the southern part of Italy and it is here where his legend grew.

The legend of Milo’s celebrated strength began I his childhood.

The now famous legend goes, that he carried his pet calf daily increasing the distance gradually.

As the calf grew and increased in size, Milo’s muscles grew stronger and he could carry it easily when it was a full-grown ox.

 

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William Bankier: Apollo, The Scottish Hercules

apolloWilliam Bankier who was most famously known as “Apollo, The Scottish Hercules” was a well known strongman and physical culturalist of the nineteenth and early twentieth centuries.

Bankier is not well known today because his star often fell under the shadow of Eugen Sandow whose fame was prolific at the time and in the subsequent years.

That said, it could successfully be argued that Bankier’s athletic prowess and strength exceeded that of Sandow. While Sandow, a very strong man in his own right, specialised in attaining the “Grecian Ideal”, Bankier was a generalist strength trainer, boxer and professional wrestler.

He was born in December 10, 1870 in Banff, Scotland to parents who were school teachers. When Bankier was young, he was not drawn to the sedentary academic life of his parents; rather he was fascinated by the circus.

 

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Vince Gironda: Legend and Myth Review

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OK. Before you read this review, please let me make it clear to you that I am a huge Vince Gironda fan.
So there will be some bias in this analysis of Vince Gironda: Legend and Myth.
That said, I will try to genuinely give you a fair review of this e-book.
So let’s get down to brass tacks – what is this book actually about?

 

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What Does Old School Muscle Building Mean To Me?

sergio_oliva3A lot of people (including myself) have been bandying the term “old school” when referring to strength training. But this term is not that definitive when it comes to what it actually refers to in our workouts. The phrase “old school” seems to bring to mind more of an emotional response than it does an actual way of training.

To me, when I hear the words “old school muscle building”, I get distinct images in my mind of 19th Century dudes in stripey one-pieces, bent pressing shot loaded barbells, while simultaneously twirling their handlebar moustaches. Or alternatively, mid-20th Century guys benching, squatting, dipping and posing down on Muscle Beach while the “ordinary” folks gawk at them like monkeys at the local zoo.

 

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